I love Belgium!  The people are friendly and it seems like everyone runs or cycles.  On my morning runs I get lots waves, nods and “Goedemorgen!” (“Good morning!”)

Belgium isn’t necessarily known for it’s food, but it should be!  Here are some of my favorite dishes:

  • Stoofvlees - Carbonade FlamandeStoofvlees (also known as Carbonade flamande / Vlaamse karbonade).  Flemish stew is my favorite dish!  It’s stewed meat, cooked in beer and it has a slightly sweet-sour flavor.  It’s hearty and cozy, especially in the fall.  Often, it’s served with another of my favorites – Stoemp.
  • Belgian StoempStoemp. This is such a simple dish, but so tasty!  It’s mashed potatoes mixed with a seasonal vegetable.  Often it’s carrots, leeks, peas, cabbage or spinach.  Again, it’s filling and warm for a cool fall night.
  • Moules frites - musselsMussels / Moules-frites. If you are fan of mussels, you MUST get this in Belgium – it’s the national dish!  You’ll likely have a few options on the menu of different flavors, but for me it’s the traditional white wine with parsley & butter.
  • Belgian Fries - fritesBelgian fries / frites. I can’t get enough of the frites! Whether it’s with stoofvlees or mussels or just in a “cone” from a road-side stand, the fries are a must.  And, NO KETCHUP!  You have to try them with mayonnaise like the Belgians – so good!
  • Cheese CroquettesCroquettes (cheese or shrimp). I’m partial to the cheese (because I’m a cheese-aholic).  Grab a Belgian beer and some croquettes – it’s a perfect afternoon snack or happy hour appetizer.  Crispy on the outside and hot, gooey, cheesy inside.  YUM!

Yes, I know I forgot chocolate! (Some of the best in the world is from Belgium.) But, my wife, Jessica, has a whole post about finding the best chocolate in Belgium. Stay tuned!

There is so much to love about Belgium, and beer is at the top of the list!  Our running tours to Belgium would not be complete without tasting a few (or, maybe a few cases) of the best beer in the world.  Belgium has over 160 breweries and more than 1,100 beer brands.  Some pubs in Belgium have over 400 beers available — they break out the “Trapper-Keeper” when you ask for the beer list!  I have had people tell me that they “don’t like beer,” and to me, that is like saying, “I don’t like food.”  With over 700 taste profiles, you are bound to find a beer you love (and, maybe even some you don’t!)

Below, I’ll give you a quick primer on Belgium beer.  Some of the information is a bit “beer-geeky”, but you’ll need to join us on a tour to taste for yourself how amazing and unique some of these beers really are!  (But, you don’t need to be a Beer Geek to enjoy it!)

The Beer GlassBelgian Beer Glasses

The Belgians take their beer very seriously.  Each beer has it’s own glass, which is meant to enhance and highlight the beer’s particular qualities.  The glass may be wide-mouthed, tall, or fluted, with or without a stem, tulip-shaped or straight – and, it will be branded with the name of beer you are drinking.  If, for some reason, a bar doesn’t have the correct glass available, they will ask you if another glass is acceptable, or if you would like to order a different beer — that’s how important the correct glass is!

In Belgium, don’t insist on ordering a “tap” beer.  Many brewers “bottle condition” their beer (this means the final fermentation happens in the bottle) and other small producers (such as Westvleteren) package their beer only in bottles.

What the heck does “Trappist” mean?

A Trappist brewery has a strict legal definition.  This has nothing to do with the style of beer, but rather it is about who made the beer – Trappist monks.  The designation “Trappist” on a beer label guarantees the following: the beer was produced at the monastery, monks manage the brewery and production, and the profits benefit the community and social services.  Therefore, these monastery breweries are not out to maximize profits — the proceeds must only be for the monastery’s upkeep and the monks’ social services.  (But, I think  keeping our taste buds happy is a very worthy social service!)

The six Trappist breweries are: Westmalle, Chimay, Rochefort, Orval, Achel and Westvleteren.  (You can also find two Trappist breweries in the Netherlands, and one each in Italy, Austria and the U.K., and even one in the U.S.A.)

An Abbey beer is similar to Trappist, but it does not have as strict of a definition.  The beer may be produced at a monastery, but not a Trappist monastery (for example, it may be produced by Benedictine monks), the beer may be produced by a commercial brewery in partnership with a monastery, or it may even be a commercial brew branded with the name of a defunct abbey.

Belgian Beer Styles

Kwak Belgian BeerThere are no strict beer styles in Belgium – two beers may technically be the same “style,” but they may have completely different taste profiles.  (So, be prepared to taste lots of different beers to find your favorite!)  But, below are some general guidelines for the beers you will taste in Belgium.

Belgian White Ale (Witte / Witbier)

Brewed with wheat, this beer has a unfiltered, hazy and very pale color – giving it it’s “white” name.  It is often brewed with orange peel and spices.  It’s a great beer for a warm summer day. (Alcohol – 4.5% – 5.5%)

Dubbel

The name is said to originate from the beer requiring twice as much grain as a “regular” beer.  This style has been brewed by monks and secular breweries for centuries.  Dubbels are typically dark brown in color and it’s flavors are malt-driven — dried fruit, chocolate-caramel with very little (or no) hop bitterness.  (Alcohol – 6% – 8%)

Tripel

As with the Dubbel, the Tripel required three times the grain of a “regular” beer.  Even though the Tripel is higher in alcohol than the Dubbel, it is much lighter in color (a yellowish, golden color versus the dark red or brown of the Dubbel).  The flavors will be spicy with bright fruit with tons of carbonation.  The alcohol is often not very detectable in the flavor, so be careful with this one!  (Alcohol 7.5% – 10%)

Strong Blond Ale

Duvel Belgian BeerThis beer is similar to a Tripel, but it is a little less sweet and more bitter.  It will have some fruity and spicy flavors and dry finish.  This is what most people think of when they think “Belgian beer.”  The name is often a give-away for this style — Duvel (meaning “Devil” in Flemmish), “Lucifer” or “Delerium Tremens.”  (Alcohol – 7.5% – 10.5%)

Strong Dark Ale

Westvleteren Trappist BeerA Belgian strong blond ale may be a close cousin to a tripel but a Belgian strong dark ale is not closely related to a dubbel. One important distinction is that the strong dark ale often uses roasted malt, which achieves a darker color and more toasty flavor than a dubbel. The flavors are  rich, sweet, bready,  and caramel-like with dark fruit notes like prunes, plums or fig.  This style includes the Westvleteren 12 which many beer connoisseurs describe as the best beer in the world.  (Alcohol – 8% – 12%)

 

Sour Beers

Belgian Lambic BeerSour beers could be a complete article by themselves!  Sours are made with spontaneous fermentation – the beer vats are left open to wild yeasts in the air.  This produces unique flavors and sometimes very sour flavors.  There are a couple different sub-types:  Flanders Red and Brown Ale are generally aged in oak barrels where the microorganisms help to create the sour, almost vinegary flavors.  Lambics, Geuze, Oud Bruin & fruit beers – these use open fermentation and are mostly brewed near Brussels.  These can range from sour to mild and are often blended to achieve a balanced flavor.  The fruit lambic beers are blended with strawberry (Framboise),  cherry (Kriek) or other fruits.  The fruit lambics can be sweet or slightly sour — some people compare them to a dry champagne.  (Alcohol – 5% – 7%)

Warning!

Most of the Beglian beers have a relatively high alcohol content.  Be mindful of this and make sure you don’t over-indulge!  Those cute cobblestone alleys can get a bit tricky after a few 10% beers!

Taste for Yourself!

We will be tasting many Belgian beers on our Great Breweries Marathon & 25k Tour and the Great Bruges Marathon & Half Tour.  You’ll get to see our favorite pubs in both Antwerp and Bruges, plus there will be ample time for you to explore bars & breweries, and, finally, we will head out to the countryside to visit the Westvleteren Trappist Abbey tasting room where you get taste the famous Westvleteren 12Cheers!

We are thrilled to have our amazing Great Breweries Marathon & 25k tour to offer you!  (May 10 – 17, 2019 – click here to learn more.)

antwerp belgium squareWe firmly believe that Belgium is underrated. Beer, chocolate, fries and waffles alone are a good enough draw. And a great reason to burn off some calories at the beginning of your trip! But seriously, Belgium is fantastic. The Belgian architecture is so unique and detailed and the Belgian’s are full of pride to share their country with you.

You will get to experience the city of Antwerp before and after the race and this city has so much to offer. It has an amazing history of being a port city for commerce and for those departing from Europe in and around WWII. Not to mention it has an amazing shopping and fashion community, being home to one of the oldest fashion academies and most renown fashion colleges. There are other things to do if shopping isn’t your thing…check out the many amazing pubs, visit the cathedral, tour the Ruebens house & museum if you are interested in art. The, list truly goes on and on.

Great Breweries Marathon 2017
Great Breweries Marathon 2017

But the race… the Belgians know how to enjoy their brews. The race runs through three top breweries in Belgium. And it finishes at one of those breweries where the celebration commences after the race. Tee shirt… check. Medal… check. “To go” box of a beer from each of those breweries… check. Three complimentary beers in, of course, the correct Belgian glass… check. So much fun and an amazing experience…. definitely, check! (Oh yeah, and there’s loads of fries & waffles post race as well.)

Bruges Canal and TowerThen we visit Bruges, quite possibly the quaintest town you’ve ever seen complete with more beer, more chocolate & canals everywhere with more amazing architecture. Nothing of Bruges has changed since at least the 1500s. So you can imagine how unique it must be. On top of all of that, you will visit the monastery where they make the best beer in the world!

Run your heart out and then enjoy the laid back culture (despite all the things to do!) that Belgium has to offer!

Book this once in a lifetime experience and come run with us!

Questions? We’d love to answer all of them. Feel free to call or message us.  Call Jessica at 970-445-0968 or Dan at 970-368-2326.

Check out the itinerary of this tour and get the specifics of all of the amazing experiences you will have.  Or, watch our video chat about the Great Breweries Marathon & 25k Tour.